EL PROBLEMA DE AGUA POTABLE ESTA CORREGIDO

Customers of Capital Region Water were notified on Friday, February 18, 2022 of a problem with our drinking water and were advised to “BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING”. We are pleased to report that the problem has been corrected and that it is no longer necessary to “BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING”. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

As always, you may contact Capital Region Water at 888-510-0606 or writing to 100 Pine Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17103 with any comments or questions. You can also visit capitalregionwater.com to learn more.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

This notice is being sent to you by Capital Region Water. PWS ID 7220049

Date distributed: February 20, 2022

BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING

Hiervan el agua antes de usarla.

Este informe contiene información importante acerca de su agua potable.  Haga que alguien lo traduzca para usted, o hable con alguien que lo entienda.

We routinely monitor the conditions in the distribution system. On Friday, February 18, 2022, we experienced a loss of positive water pressure due to a water main break impacting 1712, 1713, 1714, 1715, 1716, 1717, 1718, 1719, 1720, 1721, and 1722 Boas Street also 919 and 1001 N. 17th Street in Harrisburg. A loss of positive water pressure is a signal of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through back-flow by back pressure or back-siphonage.  As a result, there is an increased chance that the water may contain bacteria that can make you sick.

What should I do?

DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a rolling boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using; or use bottled water.  You should use boiled or bottled water for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and food preparation until further notice.

Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.

These symptoms, however, are not caused only by organisms in drinking water, but also by other factors. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice.

People with severely compromised immune systems, infants, and some elderly may be at increased risk. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. General guidelines on ways to lessen the risk of infection by microbes are available from EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1 (800) 426‑4791.

What happened and what is being done?

A water main break created a low/no pressure situation at this location. Efforts are underway to isolate the leak and restore normal system level and pressure as quickly as possible.

We will inform you when all corrective actions have been completed and when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Robert E. Young Water Services Center, 888-510-0606

100 Pine Dr, Harrisburg, PA 17103

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

This notice is being sent to you by: Capital Region Water, PWS ID#: 7220049     

Date distributed: February 18, 2022

EL PROBLEMA DE AGUA POTABLE ESTA CORREGIDO

Customers of Capital Region Water were notified on Friday, February 11, 2022, of a problem with our drinking water and were advised to “BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING”. We are pleased to report that the problem has been corrected and that it is no longer necessary to “BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING”. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

As always, you may contact Capital Region Water at 888-510-0606 or write to 100 Pine Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17103 with any comments or questions. You can also visit capitalregionwater.com to learn more.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

This notice is being sent to you by Capital Region Water. PWS ID 7220049 Date distributed: 02/13/2022


BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING

Hiervan el agua antes de usarla.

Este informe contiene información importante acerca de su agua potable. Haga que alguien lo traduzca para usted, o hable con alguien que lo entienda.

We routinely monitor the conditions in the distribution system. On Friday, February 11, 2022, we experienced a loss of positive water pressure due to a water main break impacting properties at 1503, 1505, 1507, and 1509 Cameron Terrace in Harrisburg. A loss of positive water pressure is a signal of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through back-flow by back pressure or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the water may contain bacteria that can make you sick.

What should I do?

DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a rolling boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using; or use bottled water. You should use boiled or bottled water for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and food preparation until further notice.

Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.

These symptoms, however, are not caused only by organisms in drinking water, but also by other factors. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice.

People with severely compromised immune systems, infants, and some elderly may be at increased risk. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. General guidelines on ways to lessen the risk of infection by microbes are available from EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1 (800) 426‑4791.

What happened and what is being done?

A water main break created a low/no pressure situation at this location. Efforts are underway to repair the break and restore normal system level and pressure as quickly as possible.

We will inform you when all corrective actions have been completed and when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Robert E. Young Water Services Center, 888-510-0606

100 Pine Dr, Harrisburg, PA 17103

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

This notice is being sent to you by: Capital Region Water, PWS ID#: 7220049 

Date distributed: February 11, 2022

Capital Region Water testifies before Senate committee examining challenges municipal authorities face in trying to get the state to meet its own clean water obligations

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is refusing to pay $32,246 per month, or $386,956 per year, in stormwater fees assessed on its 22 accounts totaling nearly 5.4 million square feet of impervious area within Capital Region Water’s jurisdiction, according to testimony presented by CRW before the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee today.

That means residential and commercial customers will have to pay the difference to help fund capital improvement projects designed to upgrade outdated and undersized water and wastewater infrastructure and fulfill state and federal clean water requirements to prevent runoff from entering the Susquehanna River and Paxton Creek.

“I can tell you firsthand that residents and business owners in Harrisburg are not happy about what the Commonwealth is doing. People want to know how the Commonwealth can get away with this when others are stepping up to meet their obligations. And, honestly, I am at a loss about what to tell them,” CRW Board Chairman Marc Kurowski testified.

In June 2019, as part of its City Beautiful H2O Program, CRW proposed a Stormwater Fee Proposal and Implementation Plan as an equitable way to meet federal and state clean water requirements. After three formal public hearings, dozens of community meetings and forums, and meetings with some of the largest and most affected property owners, including the Commonwealth, CRW enacted a new stormwater fee that took effect Oct. 1, 2020.

Capital Region Water’s stormwater fee is projected to raise about $5.3 million annually in dedicated funds specifically for stormwater upgrades and operations that will help to alleviate the localized flooding that residents experience — but only if all ratepayers, including the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, fulfill their obligation.

“Capital Region Water does not earn a profit and invests its revenue into operating and improving the Harrisburg area’s water and wastewater systems. So, the commonwealth’s failure to pay leaves a huge gap in our budget and puts a terrible strain on our stormwater operations,” CRW Chief Executive Officer Charlotte Katzenmoyer testified.

Unlike most municipal authorities, Capital Region Water faces unique challenges because of the high percentage of state properties within its jurisdiction — about 10 percent of its stormwater billings are related to government properties — and because roughly one in three residents lives below the poverty rate. The state’s refusal to pay hits them hardest.

The state contends it has no obligation to pay stormwater fees for its properties within Capital Region Water’s jurisdiction — or those in the jurisdictions of other municipal authorities — because stormwater fees, unlike water and sewer fees, are a tax to which the Commonwealth is immune. But the assessment is flawed and counter to established case law.

Taxes finance general government operations. A fee is distinctly limited to the costs of a specific service and must be reasonably proportional to the charge. As opposed to generating revenue for an array of uses as a tax would, the stormwater fee is raising dedicated revenue that will be redirected back into the system for specifically stormwater projects.

The Commonwealth’s refusal to pay also is in stark contrast to the federal government, which pays stormwater fees. The Clean Water Act, Section 313 (c), was amended in 2010 to make clear the responsibility of federal agencies to pay fees for stormwater programs.

“At Capital Region Water, we are working to meet our obligations for federal clean water requirements, improve water quality locally, and reduce localized flooding for our residents and those downstream, and address polluted runoff. Our residents and businesses are doing their part, too. All we are asking for is the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to do the same,” Kurowski said.

Capital Region Water was the first of several authorities and organizations to testify before the Senate panel, which is examining challenges with stormwater fees and implementation across Pennsylvania.

To read Testimony from Capital Region Water CEO, Charlotte Katzenmoyer and CRW Board of Directors Chairman, Marc Kurowski click here

To watch a recording of the hearing click here

To learn more about City Beautiful H2O click here

Panel will examine Commonwealth’s obligation to pay stormwater fees, which it is refusing to do, passing the burden to city residents, businesses

Capital Region Water Chief Executive Officer Charlotte Katzenmoyer and Board Chairman Marc Kurowski, P.E., will testify before the state Senate Environmental Resources & Energy Committee at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 25 in Room 8-EB in the East Wing of the Capitol Complex in Harrisburg.

Capital Region Water will be the first of several authorities and organizations to testify before the panel, which is examining challenges with stormwater implementation across Pennsylvania.

In June 2019, as part of its City Beautiful H2O Program, Capital Region Water proposed a Stormwater Fee Proposal and Implementation Plan to meet federal and state clean water requirements. After three formal public hearings, dozens of community meetings and forums, and meetings with some of the largest and most affected property owners, including the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Capital Region Water enacted a new stormwater fee that took effect Oct. 1, 2020.

Unlike most municipal authorities, Capital Region Water faces a unique challenge because of all the state properties within its jurisdiction, and because roughly one in three residents lives below the poverty rate. Right now, however, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is refusing to pay stormwater fees assessed on its 22 accounts totaling nearly 5.4 million square feet of impervious area within CRW’s jurisdiction, meaning city residents and businesses have to make up the difference to ensure necessary capital improvement projects are funded.

Since its inception in 2013, Capital Region Water has invested more than $170 million to improve water and wastewater infrastructure and address a backlog of deferred maintenance projects that stretches back decades. But, because of the age and design of the city’s infrastructure — coupled with decades of deferred maintenance — managing stormwater remains one of Capital Region Water’s biggest challenges. Adequate funding is crucial.

Capital Region Water’s stormwater fee will raise about $5.3 million annually in dedicated funds specifically for stormwater upgrades and operations — but only if all ratepayers, including the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, fulfill their obligation.

The committee meeting will be streamed live at https://environmental.pasenategop.com/.

Capital Region Water responded to a federal court’s ruling that grants intervenor status to the Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper as the authority continues its work with state and federal regulators on an updated consent decree that outlines clean water commitments.

“Capital Region Water remains focused on finding equitable and innovative ways to reduce combined sewer overflows, repair aging infrastructure, address localized flooding and runoff, and meet state and federal clean water requirements, while also minimizing the burden on our ratepayers,” CRW Chief Executive Officer Charlotte Katzenmoyer said.

“We have made tremendous progress over the years to address a backlog of deferred maintenance projects and upgrade outdated and undersized wastewater and stormwater infrastructure,” she continued. “We look forward to updating and finalizing the consent decree as we continue to meet our clean water commitments to protect and enhance the long-term health of our city and its waterways.”

Harrisburg is one of dozens of combined sewer overflow (CSO) communities around the country under consent decrees or orders to control runoff into local waterways.

Capital Region Water has been operating under a partial consent decree since 2015 to update its infrastructure to reduce combined sewer overflows that discharge into the Susquehanna River and Paxton Creek. The authority is developing decree updates and a final consent decree with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). A plan was submitted in 2018, and Capital Region Water has continually been engaged with both EPA and DEP to reach a final, approved long-term control plan as well as a schedule of near-term actions to be implemented for substantial clean water progress.

On Friday, December 17, 2021, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania approved the Lower Susquehanna Riverkeeper’s request to intervene in the decree case.

Since 2013, Capital Region Water has invested more than $170 million to improve its water and wastewater infrastructure. As part of its City Beautiful H2O Program, Capital Region Water will spend hundreds of millions more to meet state and federal clean water requirements. Enactment of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act creates new opportunities, with Pennsylvania set to receive $1.4 billion over five years for water infrastructure improvements.

Capital Region Water’s Board of Directors voted to approve 2022 budgets and rates during its public monthly meeting held Tuesday, November 23. Using the organization’s core value of “Flowing Together”, Capital Region Water presented a plan to continue investing in the city’s future while balancing the affordability challenges facing so many of its customers.

Drinking water rates will increase by 3% from the current $10.04 to $10.34 per 1,000 gallons with a monthly “Ready to Serve” charge of $8.17 for a standard 5/8” sized tap. Wastewater rates for Harrisburg city residents will increase by 4% from the current $8.23 per 1,000 gallons to $8.56 per 1,000 gallons. There will not be any change to the stormwater fee for Harrisburg residents. The average residential property will continue to see a flat fee of $6.15 per month.

“At Capital Region Water, we are focused on finding equitable and creative ways to repair aging infrastructure, reduce combined sewer overflows, address localized flooding and runoff, and meet state and federal clean water requirements,” explains Capital Region Water CEO Charlotte Katzenmoyer. “It’s a testament to our leadership that we’ve been able to keep rates predictable each year we present our proposal.”

Under the new rate structure, the average Harrisburg customer consuming 45,000 gallons of water annually will pay approximately $2.60 per month more for water and wastewater services. Capital Region Water’s drinking water and wastewater rates and the stormwater fee continue to be comparable to other utilities in the region.

The recently passed Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will provide approximately $17.8 billion in new spending allocated to Pennsylvania. The state can expect to receive $1.4 billion over five years to improve water infrastructure, and Capital Region Water plans to pursue that funding.

“We also look forward to working with City of Harrisburg officials to maximize the investment of American Rescue Plan Act or ARPA resources which provide about $48 million locally,” added Marc Kurowski, Capital Region Water Board Chair. “With water and sewer infrastructure projects as an eligible use of funds, investments to reduce pollution just make environmental and financial sense.” As a municipal authority, Capital Region Water, which is audited annually by an independent financial auditing firm, does not earn a profit, and invests its revenue into operating and improving the Harrisburg area’s drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater systems.

For more information on the drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater budgets and rates, please visit https://capitalregionwater.com/resources/financial-reports/.

Capital Region Water applauds the passage of infrastructure legislation providing for further investment in clean and safe water services. Enactment of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act serves to support Capital Region Water’s short- and long-term capital spending plans.

“With this federal funding, Capital Region Water could have a unique opportunity to help alleviate the burden of cost on our customers,” said Capital Region Water CEO Katzenmoyer. “These funds would shorten our project horizon and ensure we continue to provide affordable water services for the most vulnerable customers in our region as we complete all needed capital improvements”.

Capital Region Water will present proposed 2022 drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater budgets and rates to the Board of Directors for consideration during a public meeting beginning at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 17, 2021.

“The budget proposal process is an important step towards ensuring safe and reliable drinking water and wastewater service continues for our customers,” explains Katzenmoyer. “With our core value “Flowing Together” as our theme this year, Capital Region Water strives to be proficient in investing in our city’s future while balancing the affordability challenges facing so many of our customers. It’s a testament to our leadership that we’ve been able to keep rates predictable.”

The 2022 proposed budget priorities and initiatives include:

  • Investment in critical infrastructure including $10.4 million in capital improvement projects for the drinking water system, $32.2 million in capital improvement projects for the wastewater system, and almost $7.6 million in green stormwater infrastructure improvements;
  • Implementation of the Long-Term Control Plan that has been negotiated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection to improve local water quality;
  • Optimization of the Customer Experience through assistance and incentive programs; and
  • Partnership to continue wastewater testing for COVID-19.

The recently passed Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will provide approximately $17.8 billion in new spending allocated to Pennsylvania. The state can expect to receive $1.4 billion over five years to improve water infrastructure.

As a municipal authority, Capital Region Water is eligible to pursue forgivable loans and grant opportunities such as those provided through this new legislation. Capital Region Water does not earn a profit and invests its revenue into operating and improving the Harrisburg area’s water systems.

Capital Region Water’s Board of Directors will meet for the Special Board Meeting. Customers are encouraged to attend and provide comment. Meeting details can be found at https://capitalregionwater.com/board-meetings/. The Board of Directors is scheduled to approve 2022 budgets and rates at their Regular Meeting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, November 23.

EL PROBLEMA DE AGUA POTABLE ESTA CORREGIDO

Customers of Capital Region Water were notified on Wednesday, November 3, 2021, of a problem with our drinking water and were advised to “BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING”. We are pleased to report that the problem has been corrected and that it is no longer necessary to “BOIL YOUR WATER BEFORE USING”. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience.

As always, you may contact Capital Region Water at 888-510-0606 or writing to 100 Pine Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17103 with any comments or questions. You can also visit capitalregionwater.com to learn more.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

This notice is being sent to you by Capital Region Water. PWS ID 7220049 Date distributed: 11/6/2021

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